Tagged: Supreme Court

While Navigating Middle Ground, Supreme Court Upholds Congressional Subpoena for President Trump’s Financial Records (Part II of II)

In a companion case to Trump v. Vance, which I discussed in Part I, the Supreme Court, in Trump v. Mazars, rejected Trump and DOJ’s challenges to enforcement of congressional subpoenas for Trump’s financial records.  Again, Chief Justice Roberts, writing for the Court, in a 7-2 vote, upheld the subpoenas but ordered the lower court to apply a comprehensive four-part test to the proposed subpoenas....

Episode 152 — Supreme Court Issues Two Important Decisions on Subpoenas for President Trump’s Financial Records

The Supreme Court, in two important decisions issued on the last day of the Term, rejected Trump and DOJ challenges to a New York Criminal Grand Jury subpoena and several Congressional subpoenas for Trump’s financial records. In a decisive ruling, in Trump v. Vance, the Supreme Court rejected by a 7-2 vote, President Trump’s challenges to a New York State grand jury subpoena.  In a separate case, Trump...

In Decisive Ruling, Supreme Court Rejects Trump Administration Challenges to State Criminal Grand Jury Subpoena (Part I of II)

In a decisive ruling, in Trump v. Vance, the Supreme Court rejected President Trump’s challenges to a New York State grand jury subpoena.  In a 7-2 vote, The Supreme Court rejected the Trump Administration challenges.  In a separate case, Trump v. Mazars, which will be analyzed in Part II tomorrow, the Supreme Court rejected challenges by a vote of 7 to 2 to Congress’ subpoena...

Supreme Court Restricts Disgorgement Remedy

In an important case decided in June 2020, the Supreme Court, in Liu et al v. SEC, addressed the SEC’s ability to seek “equitable relief” in civil proceedings.  In 2017, the Supreme Court, in Kokesh v. SEC, ruled that a disgorgement order in an SEC action constitutes a “penalty” for purposes of application of the five-year statute of limitations.  The Supreme Court left open the...

Defining Corruption: From the Framers to the Supreme Court’s Decision in Citizens United (Part I of II)

One of the more esoteric debates among legal scholars focuses on defining corruption and the political roots of anti-corruption efforts.  As it turns out, scholars have pointed to the Framers debate and provisions in the U.S. Constitution to support the idea that in creating the United States government, the Framers were significantly concerned about the pernicious effects of corruption on government. The debate on corruption...

Supreme Court Narrows Criminal Tax Obstruction of Justice Statute

The Supreme Court ruled in a criminal tax case, Marinello v. United States, that a criminal tax obstruction of justice was overly broad.  In a 7-2 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the Government must prove that the defendant was aware of a pending tax-related proceeding, such as an investigation or audit, or could reasonably foresee that such a proceeding would commence.  The Supreme Court’s...

The FCPA Implications of the Supreme Court’s McDonnell Decision – A Mountain Out of a Molehill?

The Supreme Court’s decision in the McDonnell case was expected. It was evident that the Supreme Court was going to reverse the convictions when it granted a stay of McDonnell’s sentence and agreed to hear the case. Sometimes we all suffer from FCPA myopia and see the world only through the FCPA lens. The McDonnell case has very little that is directly applicable to the...

The McDonnell Case: Supreme Court Weighs Limiting Bribery Statute

We all suffer from a little myopia. Following FCPA enforcement and compliance issues makes a lot of sense in today’s enforcement environment. However, there is plenty of domestic enforcement of bribery laws – the New York corruption investigations and prosecutions and the recent high-profile prosecution of Virginia Governor McDonnell are just a few of the high profile domestic prosecutions. The Supreme Court recently heard argument...

Supreme Court Called Upon to Review the Newman Case and Address Insider Trading Liability

The Supreme Court is very likely to enter into the fray over the Second Circuit’s controversial Newman decision concerning insider-trading liability. The government has filed a petition for certiorari, and the stakes are high. Insider trading liability for unauthorized disclosures to tip recipients (‘tipees”) flows from the common sense notion that an insider cannot engage, directly or indirectly, in insider trading by personally benefitting from...